Aggression in Dogs

Aggression manifests as snapping or biting, or your dog growling at family membersstrangers, or other dogs.  Angry, biting, growling dogs can frighten people terribly or even injure them. Whether the dog directs it at one person or many, it’s something that needs addressing because it won’t get better on its own. If it’s not dealt with, dominance aggression could develop. 

Dominance aggression is where the dog believes he is the pack master. Every time you pull back to avoid the angry dog, your reaction reinforces his authority in his mind. To overcome this behavior, you need to consider taking your dog to a professional for Dog Aggression Training No. 1.

In this article, we’ll go through why your dog exhibits this behavior. We’ll also look at how you can prevent it from recurring.  

Why Is My Dog Aggressive?

There are several reasons that dogs become aggressive. These include: 

  • The dog is being territorial and protecting its own space.
  • It could also be a pack member that your dog is protecting.
  • He might be trying to guard something he feels is valuable to him.
  • The dog might be acting out of fear.
  • He might feel he is defending himself.
  • A dog that you haven’t adequately socialized
  • Dogs that act out of frustration or boredom
  • They may be redirecting their aggression because they can’t get to the real target.
  • They often act aggressively if in pain.
  • It could be out of sexual frustration.
  • They might see their target as prey.

How to Treat Dog Aggression

Find Out What the Cause Is

The first step in the treatmentfor dog aggression is to understand what causes the behavior. A dog acting out of fear needs a different approach to one who sees you as prey. Start by keeping track of when the anger and aggression happen, who it happens with, and so on.  

 Speak to Your Vet

Consulting with a veterinarian is crucial if your dog doesn’t usually behave this way. The vet can rule out any underlying medical causes.

See a Behaviorist or Trainer

They’ll help you establish the reason behind the behavior. Then they’ll assist with a plan to correct the behavior. It’s essential to follow their advice to the letter. Aggressive behavior is hard to adjust, and so a lot of patience is required. 

 Punishment Is a Bad Idea

By punishing the dog, you’re only going to escalate the situation. It might also make him act without warning in the future. 

 Medication Might Be Necessary

If the dog has a naturally neurotic temperament, medicine might work permanently. For most dogs, though, drugs are a temporary fix to stop the aggression. Your vet is the best person to advise you here.

Can You Carry Out the Plan? 

If your dog’s aggression comes from boredom or too much energy, will you be able to stick to the plan your behaviorist has come up with? In some cases, the dog may be better off in a home with no other pets or small kids. You might have to consider giving him up for his good.

 Conclusion

Aggression must be dealt with as quickly as possible. The first step is to note the symptoms and try to identify the cause. If the reason for the aggression is psychological, you or a trainer must teach the dog how to react more appropriately.

It’s not something that is going to happen overnight. As a result, you’ll need to exhibit a lot of patience with your dog. If you’re not able or prepared to put in the necessary work, you might need to consider placing him in another home.

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